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Progress from the Redmond Studio

September 14, 2011

Here’s what’s been happening in Redmond:

I’ve been making progress on the plaster sculpture. You can see earlier pictures of this project here. This will be one of two entries in the Windows to the Divine show in Denver this November.

I also built two sets of panels. One set I made from reclaimed wood, for a distressed panel look:

The other set consists of smooth masonite panels, for a nativity book I’m working on:

Plus I built two frames for my Jeff Pugh paintings (obviously they still need a finish):

And I built stretchers for my George De La Tour copy project.

Last but not least, we positioned the tub, marked the drain, and used a cement cutter to start creating a hole for the tub drain:

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Advanced Figure Class Syllabus

September 1, 2011

My advanced figure drawing/painting class starts one week from today. I still have one or two openings. The class is always a lot of fun, and we learn a lot together. It’s a little bit of a time commitment–the more time you put into it, the more you’ll get out of it. But don’t be intimidated by the level of expertise of the other students–if you’re interested in taking the class, please let me know. It’s held Thursday evenings 6-9pm in Provo. I’m including the course syllabus in this post so you have a more detailed overview of what we’ll be doing.

Course Syllabus

IN CLASS:

We will draw from the figure in class every week, in your preferred medium. You should push that medium as far as you can during the course of the semester, whether it be pen and ink, graphite, prismacolor, nupastel, transfer drawing, oil paint . . .or reclaimed garbage for that matter. Whatever you want to use is fine.

Bring everything you need to draw two short gestures and a long pose every week. Plan on including a detail of either the hands or feet in your drawing, similar to the drawing shown here.


Also, bring your homework assignments.

HOMEWORK:

1. Complete the Copy Analysis Form I (see below).
2. Copy a master work.
3. Create your own work using elements from the master copy.
4. Draw a hand or foot from life every week.
5. Draw a hand or foot from a master painting every week.
6. Take photographic reference of a hand or foot every week.
7. Complete the Copy Analysis Form 2 (see below).

HOMEWORK SCHEDULE:

September 8th: – Bring your completed Copy Analysis Form I
September 15th: – Bring your panel or canvas with a completed underpainting of the master copy.
– Bring a hand drawn from life.
– Bring a hand drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed hand for later use as reference material.
September 22nd: – Bring composition sketches for your new painting based on the master copy.
– Bring a hand drawn from life.
– Bring a hand drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed hand for later use as reference material.
September 29th: – Bring your panel or canvas with a completed underpainting of your new painting based on the master copy.
– Bring a hand drawn from life.
– Bring a hand drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed hand for later use as reference material.
October 6th: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a hand drawn from life.
– Bring a hand drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed hand for later use as reference material.
October 13th: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a hand drawn from life.
– Bring a hand drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed hand for later use as reference material.
October 20th: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a FOOT drawn from life.
– Bring a FOOT drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed FOOT for later use as reference material.
October 27th: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a foot drawn from life.
– Bring a foot drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed foot for later use as reference material.
November 3rd: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a foot drawn from life.
– Bring a foot drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed foot for later use as reference material.
November 10th: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a foot drawn from life.
– Bring a foot drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed foot for later use as reference material.
November 17th: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a foot drawn from life.
– Bring a foot drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed foot for later use as reference material.
December 1st: – Bring both your master copy and your new painting based on the master copy so we can see how they are developing.
– Bring a foot drawn from life.
– Bring a foot drawn from any master painting.
– Bring a photo you took of a purposefully posed foot for later use as reference material.
– Bring your completed Copy Analysis Form II

———–

And guess what. I’m going to do all this homework along with the students. Here’s the painting I’m going to copy, and below is the copy analysis form:

Georges de La Tour, St.Joseph, the Carpenter


COPY ANALYSIS FORM 1

Pick a master painting that you love. You need to have a good reproduction of it in a book or on the web, and even detail shots if possible. You will copy this work in the same scale and medium as the original. Don’t choose a twelve foot painting. This should be a manageable size, so you can finish the piece or at least come close to finishing the piece during the course of the semester. You will simultaneously create your own composition based on what you’re learning from the master copy.

Please answer the following questions about the master work you’ve chosen to copy:

1. What kind of rectangle or non-rectangle has the artist chosen, and how has the artist divided or filled up the space? Has the artist used traditional geometric divisions within the rectangle, such as golden sections or squares?

2. Where does the painting lead your eye—what is the primary eyepath of the artwork? What secondary eyepaths can you see within the composition?

3. How has the artist used value (light and dark contrast) to move the eye and create emphasis?

4. What is the overall color scheme and/or color harmony?

5. How has the artist used color to move the eye and create emphasis?

6. Does the artist use a cool/warm dither, simple gradations, or flat shapes of color?

7. How has the artist used repeated shapes to move the eye and create rhythm?

8. How has the artist used repeated marks to move the eye and create unity and/or variety?

9. How has the artist depicted the human figure? Is it stylized? Is it idealized? Is it classical, realist, or modern? Is it hyper-realistic? Is it strictly tonal, strictly linear, or a combination of the two?

10. How has the artist used lines and edges?

11. How has the artist used perspective, including atmospheric perspective? What other methods has the artist employed to push and pull objects in and out of the picture plane?

12. How has the artist manipulated the surface of the painting, including the ground layer? Is it egg-shell smooth? Are there areas of thick, impasto paint? Are there any textural hints to the artist’s painting process?

13. What do you think the artist was trying to say? Was the artist reacting to a previous artistic movement? What do you guess were the artist’s aesthetic and thematic goals? What do you think the artist was hoping to communicate to the viewer?

14. Now that you’ve begun to copy the master painting, begin your own painting using elements learned from the copy. Based on the above questions, write a brief outline (15-30 sentences) describing what you intend to do similarly to the master painting in your own new painting and what you intend to do differently. How will your composition be the same? How will it be adapted to your own voice and ideas?

COPY ANALYSIS FORM 2

Refer to your initial copy analysis form. Now that your paintings are finished, briefly describe (15-30 sentences) how your painting turned out. What elements does it share with the master painting copy? What elements are different and unique to your new composition?

Portrait of My Daughter

August 24, 2011

 

I finished the portraits of my daughter and son. Yes, Amy was happy for the birthday present! And I am happy to have finally painted my children.

Here’s a fast-motion youtube video of one of the portraits. Also, folioacademy asked me to create a step-by-step demo video with detailed instructions, for anyone out there interested in learning to paint a portrait like this on your own.

 

Art Classes I’m Teaching This Fall

August 1, 2011

Holy Cow! It has been weeks since I’ve posted. A lot has happened. If everything goes as planned, as of August 15th, my new in-house studio will look like this:

We’ll be holding the Saturday morning class here in this room. The other class, the advanced figure class, will continue in Santiago’s studio in Provo. Please send me an email and let me know if you may be wanting to take either class, so I have an idea of what to expect. Click here to find descriptions of the two classes, as well as a calendar and tuition for the two classes.

Actually let me just describe the classes to you here:

1. Advanced Figure Class:

This a professional development class for those who want to begin or further a career as a fine artist. The class meets weekly. Our fall 2011 semester will consist of the following: a. Weekly drawing sessions from the live model–an individual approach to drawing the model is encouraged. b. An emphasis this semester will be hands and feet. A small part of each class, as well as homework assignments, will be dedicated to drawing hands and feet. c. We will also copy a master painting and do our own painting simultaneously, using things learned from the copy. Click here for class schedule and tuition information.

2. Saturday Morning Class:

This class is open to a wide range of students, beginning to advanced. We meet roughly twice a month to work on the students projects for 2 1/2 hours. Bring your own projects, and I’ll help walk you through to completion. Cost is $35 per class. Click here for class schedule and tuition information.

Progress from the Redmond Studio

July 3, 2011

Time for another update to show you happened during my last session at the studio in Redmond. I had a lot to get done in a short period of time, including coming up with a birthday present for Amy, my wife. So here’s what I ended up getting accomplished this time around:

Breath of Life, in progress

I did some more work on the Breath of Life painting. I glazed over the heavy textured areas at the bottom of the painting, darkening the dirt and making it glow a bit. Then I worked on the Adam figure, trying to keep it fairly loose still, and making it come and go amidst the “dust particles.” You can see the before pictures here.

Angels in progress

Angels in progress

The angel sculpture started to take form a little. I painted a rough composition on the wood and started adding plaster. It was going to be a wide piece with four sides, but now I think it will be two separate one-sided sculptures when it’s done. One of them will hopefully be featured at the Windows to the Divine Show in Denver during the month of November.

Christus sculptures in progress

Christus sculptures in progress

I worked a little on two plaster Christus sculptures. You can see I added arms and filled out the body a little on the larger sculpture. Slow progress, but they’re coming. If you work much with this wire mesh, consider wearing gloves. I really sliced a hole in my finger this week while working on these!

Portrait of the Artist's Daughter in progress

Portrait of the Artist's Son in progress

These two little portraits in progress were done in secret for my wife’s birthday. I’ve never painted portraits of our children, so this was long overdue. Amy was happy for the birthday surprise. The painting of my daughter still needs a glaze and a few small adjustments. Clearly the painting of my son has a long way to go. When our third and fourth are a little older, I’ll paint portraits of them as well.

These two portraits were filmed, so I plan to have a step-by-step video explaining the process, to be posted before long. It will most likely be uploaded to an exciting new website of painting demos being developed by my good friend Will Terry.

New mattress

And last but not least, improvements on the studio itself. Amy bought me this mattress for Fathers day, so I started building a bed to put it on out of old left-over materials. I think it’ll be pretty cool when it’s done.

Bed in progress

Tune in next time for more progress from the Redmond studio.

New Pieces Acquired – Jeff Pugh

June 28, 2011

Amy and I are quite excited about these two new original Jeff Pugh paintings we just added to our collection. Jeff was just awarded first place at the competitive Spring Salon at the Springville Museum of Art–quite a feat!! Thanks, Jeff, for these beautiful pieces!

Caught Staring by Jeffery Pugh

Row of Cattle, by Jeffery Pugh

Petition of the Blind

June 13, 2011

I already posted about the show in SLC and the painting when it was in the studio. But now I’ve finally got a good photograph of the painting. So here it is:

Petition of the Blind, by J. Kirk Richards

Detail from Petition of the Blind, by J. Kirk Richards

Detail from Petition of the Blind, by J. Kirk Richards

Detail from Petition of the Blind, by J. Kirk Richards